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U-Shaped Line and Maritime Delimitation

Increasingly contested waters? Conflicting maritime claims in the South China Sea

South China Sea

Increasingly contested waters? Conflicting maritime claims in the South China Sea

Clive Schofield
Director Of Research, Australian National Centre For Ocean Resources And Security (ANCORS),University Of Wollongong

What does appear to have changed in recent years is that there has been a significant escalation in tensions in the South China Sea. In particular, in recent years a series of incidents have occurred involving Chinese maritime surveillance and enforcement agencies and Chinese-flagged fishing vessels in waters closer to the proximate mainland and main island coastlines than to the nearest disputed islands. Such actions appear to be based on the nine-dashed line, rather than maritime claims in line with the terms of UNCLOS advanced from the disputed islands. Incidents have included enforcement activities related to fisheries jurisdiction, for example with respect to waters that Indonesia considers to form part of its EEZ, as well as interventions to disrupt oil and gas survey…

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