//
you're reading...
The South China Sea Arbitration: the Republic of Philippines vs. the People's Republic of China

Forecasting the Aftermath of a Ruling on China’s Nine-Dash Line

By Jerome A. Cohen

Foreign Policy April 20, 2016

China has been touting its peaceful rise for over a decade, and it has been trying to convince the international community that it is a responsible great power adhering to the rule of law. In these circumstances, it would be statesmanlike and conducive to Asian peace if Beijing were to accept the arbitration’s outcome and adopt the decision as a platform for negotiations that seek a sensible compromise. In the meantime, the more other interested states engage with international law of the sea, the better. This might stimulate both China and the United States to reconsider their postures and act in their different ways to strengthen — not weaken — the UNCLOS system. Given the sensitivity of the seas around China, world peace may depend upon it.

CgX9DQhUkAAa6Vz

Latest closeups of China’s construction at Hughes reef, including 2×76, 3×12.7 guns & 364 air search. 2x349A FC, 2 surface search radars. Photos and interpretation credit: @rajfortyseven.

CgX9DBWUEAAQlgi

Latest closeups of China’s construction at Hughes reef, including 2×76, 3×12.7 guns & 364 air search. 2x349A FC, 2 surface search radars. Photos and interpretation credit: @rajfortyseven.

Read full analysis at http://foreignpolicy.com/2016/04/20/a-big-ruling-on-the-south-china-sea-nine-dash-line-draws-near-beijing-philippines-japan-taiwan-aftermath/.

Advertisements

Discussion

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow South China Sea Research on WordPress.com

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 141 other followers

%d bloggers like this: