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China

This tag is associated with 268 posts

Chairman’s Statement of the 30th ASEAN Summit

The following is an excerpt from Chairman’s Statement of the 30th ASEAN Summit in Manila on 29 April 2017 that focuses on the South China Sea issues: South China Sea 120. We reaffirmed the importance of maintaining peace, stability, security and freedom of navigation and over-flight in and above the South China Sea. We welcomed … Continue reading

Draft ASEAN-China Codes of Conduct (2000): Text and Analysis

Source: Thayer Consultancy 26 April 2017 On 15th March 2000, senior officials from China and ASEAN met in Thailand to discuss for the first time their respective draft codes of conduct for the South China Sea. ASEAN tabled a seven point code, while China put forth a document containing twelve points. The following is the … Continue reading

The Myth of Chinese Sanctions over South China Sea Disputes

Author: Angela Poh The Washington Quarterly • 40:1 pp. 143–165 — Given significant international attention over the 2016 arbitral tribunal ruling, this article examines allegations of China’s economic aggression in its disputes with the Philippines and Vietnam over the South China Sea. The selection of these two cases is natural as China’s relations with the Philippines … Continue reading

The Offensive Realists Are Not Wrong: China’s Growth and Aggression, 1976–2001

Authors: Sung Chul Jung and Kihyun Lee Pacific Focus, Vol. XXXII, No. 1 (April 2017), 86–108 — Abstract: Is China’s rise a threat? Offensive realists see rising China as a main cause of global instability in the 21st century. Because all states seek security through power maximization, China will clash with the United States for regional … Continue reading

When Good Lawyers Write Bad History: Unreliable Evidence and the South China Sea Territorial Dispute

Author: Bill Hayton Ocean Development & International Law, Volume 48, 2017 – Issue 1: 17-34 The following are the excerpts of the paper: Abstract The recent award by an arbitral tribunal in a case brought by the Philippines against China gives lawyers reason to reexamine the historical evidence put forward by claimants in the South … Continue reading

The Collateral Damage from China’s ‘Great Wall of Sand’ – The Environmental Dimensions of the South China Sea Case

Author: Tim Stephens Legal Studies Research Paper No. 17/06, January 2017 Forthcoming in 2017 in Volume 34 of the Australian Year Book of International Law. Abstract This contribution to the Australian Year Book of International Law’s agora on the South China Sea case assesses its treatment of fisheries and environmental issues. These matters might seem only … Continue reading

In the Wake of Arbitration – Papers from the Sixth Annual CSIS South China Sea Conference

Papers from the Sixth Annual CSIS South China Sea Conference Editors: Murray Hiebert, Gregory B. Poling, Conor Cronin January 25, 2017 The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) hosted its sixth annual South China Sea conference in July 2016. The conference provided four panels of highly respected experts from 10 countries with a first … Continue reading

Beijing’s Missile Deployments in the South China Sea Whither the Code of Conduct?

Author: Koh Swee Lean Collin APPS Policy Forum, 11 January 2017 Can a form of arms control succeed in stopping the increasing militarisation of the South China Sea, or is the proposed Code of Conduct doomed to fail, Koh Swee Lean Collin asks. Quoting US officials, Fox News on 23 December 2016 revealed that China had … Continue reading

First Reactions to the Philippines v China Arbitration Award Concerning the Supposed Historic Claims of China in the South China Sea

Author: Clive R. Symmons Asia-Pacific Journal of Ocean Law and Policy 1 (2016) 260-267 Judging from the conferences I have already attended on the Award on the Merits of the Arbitral Tribunal in the case of Philippines v China (2016), the Tribunal’s award has already received much critical comment from many international lawyers. However this may … Continue reading

How the Chinese Government Fabricates Social Media Posts for Strategic Distraction, not Engaged Argument

Authors: Gary King, Jennifer Pan, Margaret E. Roberts American Political Science Review, 14 January 2017 Abstract: The Chinese government has long been suspected of hiring as many as 2,000,000 people to surreptitiously insert huge numbers of pseudonymous and other deceptive writings into the stream of real social media posts, as if they were the genuine opinions … Continue reading

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