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Nguyen Hong Thao

This tag is associated with 20 posts

Joint Development or Permanent Maritime Boundary: The Case of East Timor and Australia

Author: Nguyen Hong Thao Maritime Awareness Project, 24 January 2017 The following are the excerpts of the article: On January 9, 2017, Australia and Timor-Leste (also known as East Timor) entered a new chapter in their maritime disagreement with the release of a trilateral joint statement (PCA 2016-10) signed by the two relevant parties and … Continue reading

The Truth About ‘Aggression’ in the South China Sea

The Truth About ‘Aggression’ in the South China Sea Nguyen Hong Thao Satellite images showing the extent of land reclamation of China and Vietnam in South China Sea have sparked debates about who the biggest aggressor is and what the status quo is[1] To be specific, concept of “aggression” is mentioned in the Resolution 3314 … Continue reading

South China Sea: China’s Floating Islands Next?

IN RESPONSE to regional concerns over the large scale and pace of its conversion of coral reefs into military outposts in the South China Sea, China is contemplating an even more audacious move – floating islands in the Spratly Islands. Continue reading

Vietnam’s Position on the Sovereignty over the Paracels & the Spratlys: Its Maritime Claim

Originally posted on South China Sea:
Vietnam’s Position on the Sovereignty over the Paracels & the Spratlys: Its Maritime Claim Hong Thao Nguyen Vietnam National University – Hanoi May 4, 2012 Journal of East Asia International Law, V JEAIL (1) 2012 Abstract: The South China Sea has long been regarded as a major source of…

International law and sovereignty over the Paracel and Spratly archipelagoes (Part 16)

Originally posted on South China Sea:
Part 16: A “bull-tongue line”, an absurdity On June 15th, 1996, China ratified the 1982 UN Convention on the Law of the Sea and promulgated the Regulation on the baseline system to calculate the width of territorial waters, including Xisha (Hoàng Sa/Paracels). In accordance with China’s statement, the baseline…

International law and sovereignty over the Paracel and Spratly archipelagoes (Part 15)

Originally posted on South China Sea:
Part 15: The inviolable right to succession Since 1949, the political changes in some regional countries has led to the appearance of new state entities involving in the dispute in the East Sea (South China Sea). Here, the issue of the right to succession is of importance. Immediately after…

International law and sovereignty over the Paracel and Spratly archipelagoes (Part 14)

Originally posted on South China Sea:
Part 14: Acquisition of sovereignty over Trường Sa (Spratlys) For the Trường Sa archipelago, the first specific observations of this area took place between 1867-1868 by the British oceanographic research vessel Riflemean. Later, the area left abandoned until the scientific reconnaissance carried out by the French ship de Lanessan…

International law and sovereignty over the Paracel and Spratly archipelagoes (Part 13)

Originally posted on South China Sea:
Part 13: Setting the milestone in 1909: Too late! In August 1907, the Japanese with their ambition occupied the uninhabited islands within Dongsha archipelago, near Guangdong. This posed a direct threat to the security of China. The incident resulted in the opposite turn in China’s attitude toward Hoàng Sa…

International law and sovereignty over Paracel and Spratly archipelagoes (Part 12)

Originally posted on South China Sea:
Part 12: Occupation by force is illegal Since 1885, international law on territorial acquisition has taken profound changes. For unclaimed land (terres res nullius), effective, uninterrupted and continuous occupation with relatively large discontinuity can be compromised if it is compatible with the maintenance of rights and notification of such…

International law and sovereignty over the Paracel and Spratly archipelagoes (Part 11)

Originally posted on South China Sea:
Part 11: Legitimate occupation If the voyages for surveys and drawing of maritime routes can be considered as acts for general recognition, then the planting of wooden markers by the order of the kings created an indisputable act in establishing the power of the Annamese kingdom over the uninhabited…

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